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5 Things to do in Boston this weekend

Go see Tig Notaro at the Wilbur, of course
See more of Tinsley Hammond's work at the ARCH gallery.

COMEDY

Tig Notaro

Saturday, 7 p.m.

The Wilbur Theater

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246 Tremont St. Boston

$25, 800-745-3000

www.ticketmaster.com

Comic Tig Notaro has a cool, relaxed manner on stage, delighting in all the redundancies, statements of the obvious and manifest nonsense we use to pad out conversation. If she runs out, she’s always happy to add some of her own, such as recommending confusing your friends by texting them stuff like “What’s your ETA?” when nothing is going on.

THEATER

The Real Thing

Saturday through Nov. 23

Calderwood Pavilion

527 Tremont St.

$18, 617-933-8600

www.bostontheatrescene.com

Bad Habit Productions presents this play by Tom Stoppard, about a playwright, Henry, whose actress wife Charlotte goads him into producing a (bad) play by man she declares a “political prisoner” but whom Henry considers a mere scalawag. Through this play-within-the-play, Stoppard communicates some of his trademark existentialist ideas about appearance and reality with his trademark wit.

ART

Tinsley Hammond: The Projection Series

Through Nov. 21

ARCH Gallery

52 Everett St., Allston

Free, 518-495-4111

www.archgalleryboston.com

This Alaskan-born artist’s first show in Massachusetts features a set of boxes with beautifully colorful Rorschach-like designs. Lit from within like Chinese lanterns, they are the gallery’s only light source. The project had a surprising genesis: the notorious Tulip Bubble in 17th century Holland, during which tulips became so valuable people would stake their fortunes on a single bulb.

MUSIC

Ana Moura

Friday, 8 p.m.

Berklee Performance Center

136 Mass. Ave., Cambridge

$28-$37, 617-876-4275

www.worldmusic.org

Ana Moura is one of the biggest stars in the Portuguese fado genre, integrating poppier strains into fado’s blues-like lamentations. You don’t need to understand a word of Portuguese to discern the layers of emotional complexity she builds in her songs. She acts them as much as sings them, and her performances are as enigmatic as they are intimate.

BOOKS

Megan Amram

Monday, 7 p.m.

Brattle Theater

40 Brattle St., Cambridge

$5, 617-661-1515

www.harvard.com

Amram (a "Parks and Recreation" writer) will discuss her book “Science… For Her!”, a snarky satire of “expert advice” articles that appear in women’s magazines. Amram’s parodies of these columns explode them—and the screwed-up social expectations that often lie behind them—from the inside, laying bare the insatiable anxieties on which they prey, and which they’re more likely to exacerbate than reduce.

 
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