Another crop of Boston startups has finished its tenure with Techstars, a powerful local accelerator that trains and helps fund new companies. After three months of intense coaching, 12 CEOs made their putchs at the Back Bay Events Center on Tuesday night.   

AdmitHub: An app that makes applying to college easier. Hot: A way to do same-day booking at hotels. netra: “smarter video analytics for retail intelligence… that just works.”

“We’re here to show you how awesome grocery delivery can be,” said Yegor Anchishkin, the CEO of a company called CartFresh that transports food to customers from grocery stores without bumping up the cost of produce. In his speech, he said his company is partnering with Russo’s, the popular Watertown produce store.

RELATED: Boston/Cambridge building for the virtual reality boom

Techstars has outposts in several cities, and gives founders $118,000 in seed moneyand guidance in exchange for 7-10 percent of their company, according to the accelerator’s website.

The last hurrah is “demo day,” a platform for Techstars’ graduates can use to hook up with investors.

Pitches at Tuesday night’s event varied – from SmackHigh, which bills itself as “the place for teens to express themselves and be heard” – to ThriveHive, which helps small businesses market themselves.

Jackson Boyar, CEO of a company called Shearwater, said their tool could help support international students at colleges and boarding schools by connecting them with mentors online.

RELATED: Internet via airwaves? A Boston company is taking on Comcast

“We want every single student to have access to mentorship,” said Boyar, clad in a shirt emblazoned with the Shearwater’s logo (a bird) and jeans.

Frederico Cismondi, CEO of doDOC, pitched software that he said would speed up the process for drug manufacturers dealing with audits and help them get their drugs to market faster.

“This is a huge market and a serious problem and we are solving it today,” Cismondi said.

It was a combination of start-up entrepreneurs, high-profile local business and tech personalities and deep-pocketed investors, and the buzz could lead to a big boost for the next Boston tech success story.

RELATED:   Boston Haystack app banned by city

“Listen Boston,” said Techstars Director Eveline Buchatskiy just before intermission. “You have no idea how good you have it.”

Startups can join Techstars fall program through a competitive process. Applications for the next three-month round open Sept. 21.