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More Amtrak weekend service coming between Boston and New York

The train company is adding more Saturday and Sunday options.
An Amtrak Acela Express train at Boston's South Station.Wikimedia Commons

Amtrak will soon offer more weekend service options between Boston and New York, the railroad company announced Thursday.

Those who take Amtrak's Acela Express service will have more departure times to choose from on Saturday mornings and Sunday afternoons, beginning April 8.

For Saturdays, the first Amtrak Acela train will leave Boston's South Station at 6:10 a.m., reaching New York at 9:45 a.m., according to Amtrak spokesman Mike Tolbert.

Amtrak is also adding an additional round-trip train on Sunday evenings, which will leave Boston's South Station at 12:10 p.m. and reach New York by 3:46 p.m. That train will then leave New York at 5:03 p.m. and arrive back at South Station at 8:48 p.m.

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These trains will still stop at Boston's Back Bay station; Route 128; Providence, Rhode Island; New Haven, Connecticut; and Stamford, Connecticut, as well.

The Acela Express line often continues service down to Washington, D.C., and Amtrak has made one other late-night departure change to reach these customers: A train will leave New York at 9 p.m. on Sundays, stopping in Newark, then Philadelphia and reaching Washington at 11:45 p.m.

Amtrak said that these changes come on the heels of customers directly requesting more service.

“Acela Express has long been the preferred premium choice for travelers between Washington, New York and Boston,” said Mark Yachmetz, Amtrak vice president of NEC Business Development, in a statement. “Our responsibility is to listen to our customers and continually improve our product to make sure Amtrak is always recognized as a smarter way to travel.”

To keep up with this increasing demand, Amtrak has partnered with Alstom, a French train manufacturer, to produce 28 new high speed trains that will eventually replace the current Acela Express trains.

 
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