For book lovers, rainy weekends are a gift. You can curl up inside and read without feeling bad you aren't, you know, out doing something. Whether you want to get a little brushed up on your pope knowledge, reflect on 9/11 or celebrate our country's rich history of literature through the eyes of an outsider, these are the three new releases we're most excited about this week.

"The Promise of Francis: The Man, The Pope, and the Challenge of Change" by David Willey

Related: Staff, inmates jubilant over Pope vist to city jail

Celebrate the Papal visit with David Willey's compelling biography of Pope Francis. A hardcover, it not only makes a great coffeetable book, but is also a fascinating read. Willey has been the BBC Vatican correspondent for 40 years, so he's covered his fair share of both scandals and miraculous moments. The book chronicles Francis's first two years as the pope and predicts what to expect in the coming years.

"In the Shadow of the Towers: Speculative Fiction in a post 9/11 World" edited by Douglas Lain

This weekend we are especially reflective of the profound effect the fall of the Twin Towers had on our lives. September 11 not only changed this city, but also the entertainment we consume. Douglas Lain's anthology is a collection of short fiction stories, all inspired by 9/11, tackling issues such as morality, nostalgia and figuring out what it takes to rebuild. The central question: How can we continue to dream in the shadow of the towers?

Related: 3 books that totally get New York City living

"The Republic of Imagination: A Life In Books" by Azar Nafisi

It's hard to believe it's been 10 years since Azar Nafisi's book "Reading Lolita in Tehran" took over the New York Times best seller's list and was on everyone's recommended reading roundup. Now, Nafisi is back with another book about the power of literature. In "The Republic of Imagination," she explores how books such as Mark Twain's "The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn" and Sinclair Lewis's "Babbitt" are tied to America's founding principles. Much like "Reading Lolita in Tehran," she shares many personal stories from her own life in the book, such as how certain books influenced her decision to become an American citizen.

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