Either you already know who Ladyhawke is or you should know who Ladyhawke is. There is no acceptable in-between. After four years, the indie rocker is back on the scene with "Wild Things," her gutsy, synth-driven third studio LP, which dropped from Polyvinyl Records on June 3.

The 36-year-old New Zealander born Phillipa "Pip" Brown is currently on tour to support the release, and her live show reflects just how much she's changed over the past few years. Ladyhawke chats with us recently about getting married, getting sober and her decision to make music that reflected her happier state of being.

With "Wild Things" out earlier this month, what’s been your favorite part about getting new music out into the world?
Even after I finished recording all the material, it took another year to be released. It was such a massive release for me to just get it out into the world. It's a huge weight off my shoulders. I’m just desperate for people to hear it and hear the journey I’ve been on.
 
What inspired you this time around?
I made a lot of massive changes to get to the point where I could write "Wild Things." To stop drinking was a conscious decision to start feeling better. I’ve been feeling terrible for quite a long time, and I didn’t want it to come out in my music. After really working hard on myself and beginning to feel great, the album came pretty quickly.
 
How much of an inspiration did getting married have on the album?
I finished the record before I got married [to New Zealand actress, Madeleine Sami] but the relationship itself was definitely an inspiration for the material. I’ve moved all over the world and haven’t been able to have many relationships. Constantly going from place to place, you know? But we met in 2009 and made an agreement that we’d have to put in the work ‘cause we thought it was worth it.
 
What would you say are the best and worst aspects of going on tour?
Finding cool restaurants in different cities and getting the chance to get together with everybody and have a gorgeous meal is always pretty great. I think some of the worst parts of touring is just the distance from your loved ones. And not having any time to get ill. And if you do get ill, which happens often, you’re kind of screwed.
 
For you, what makes a great audience?
I just like looking at people smile. I hate to see people standing there with their arms crossed. They have no idea how it makes you feel. Blank expressions on their face? Horrible! People who are smiling and having a good time, that’s what I look for.
 
If you go:
 
Boston
June 21 at 7 p.m.
Brighton Music Hall
58 Brighton Ave.
$15, crossroadspresents.com

New York
June 24 at 8 p.m.
Rough Trade NYC
64 N. Ninth St., Brooklyn
Sold Out, roughtradenyc.com

Philadelphia 
June 26 at 8:30 P.M.
Boot & Saddle
1131 S. Broad St.
$15-$20, bootandsaddlephilly.com