I don’t want to make this about politics. If you read my column regularly, you probably know where I stand. What I want to talk about is history being made. This past week, Hillary Clinton became the first woman nominated by the Democratic party to run for President of the United States.

I wasn’t home during all the speeches. I was getting snippets on my phone and crying unabashedly in the car on the way home. I listened to Michelle Obama’s beautiful speech. I heard a woman accept the nomination. I saw my sister’s posts about it on Facebook. I knew how her young daughter could aspire to this office someday. Heck, I’m getting choked up while writing this. Whether you like her or not, whatever your politics, this matters. 

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Last week, I wrote about what it meant for me to see the trailer for “Wonder Woman” on the big screen when they showed it at San Diego Comic-Con. I wrote about how as a little girl I dreamed of being a superhero. I wrote about how the next generation could aspire to be greater because of her. This week, they can finally dream of being President (with some actual hope of achieving it). It isn’t just the cover of Ms. Magazine in 1972 — the one with Wonder Woman on the cover and the line, “Wonder Woman for President.” It’s a real woman. 

I hear the comments already. “You should just vote for the best person for the job.” Yes. That is indeed true. (Though I think most intelligent people would probably argue that between the two candidates, she’s the one.) True or not, the fact that we’re able to vote for her at all is the thing I’m celebrating here. After years of battling to make sure women’s voices are heard in the geek world, after years of dealing with harassment for being a woman who dares to write about video games, after watching women’s rights being attacked over and over again in other parts of the country, something like this reminds me why we fight. It reminds me of all the sacrifices of women over the years to gain our rights. 

We continue to fight, on a small battlefield, in our homes, on our computers, in the toy sections of stores, or on a large battlefield, casting our votes, serving in the military or standing in protest. We continue to fight because, sometimes, we win. 

Follow Jenna Busch on Twitter @jennabusch and visit her site, Legion of Leia