A Midtown eatery, frequented by celebrities, tourists and ordinary New Yorkers alike, will serve its famous 1-pound sandwiches for last time this week.

The Carnegie Deli, so named for its proximity to the renowned music hall, will close the doors of its original location on the corner of Seventh Avenue and 55th Street on Saturday.  

The restaurant was opened in 1937 by Bernie Gross, Max Hudas and Thomas North. The trio sold the deli to Leo Steiner and Milton Parker in 1976, and it soon became as famous for its clientele as it was for its hefty portions of pastrami and other meats.

Carnegie Deli is now operated by Parker’s daughter, Marian Harper Levine, who announced in September that she was closing the iconic eatery.

“At this stage of my life, the early mornings to late nights have taken a toll, along with my sleepless nights and grueling hours that come with operating a restaurant business,” Levine said after her announcement. “I’m very sad to close the Carnegie Deli, but I’ve reached the time of my life when I need to take a step back.” 

Locations inside The Mirage casino in Las Vegas, the Sands Casino in Bethlehem, Pennsylvania, and sports arenas will remain open. 

Levine plans to continue licensing the deli’s brand and sell its products for wholesale distribution, her spokeswoman told the New York Post.