ARTS

“Wild Women of Planet Wongo”

Revisit 1950s sci-fi at this immersive musical comedy about a planet of warrior women who have never encountered men before some hapless astronauts touch down. You can apply in advance to become a Wongette-in-Training or Wongo Man-Slave, which comes with special perks. Bonus: All tickets come with a free cocktail. Through Nov. 16, Parkside Lounge, 317 E. Houston St., $35

First Thursday Gallery Walk

Starting this week, DUMBO galleries will stay open late on the first Thursdays of each month, inviting art lovers extra time to explore the spaces and their neighborhood. In addition to grabbing a glass of wine and taking in the talents of local artists, there are also special receptions and talks. Plus, bars and restaurants in the area will have specials. Oct. 6, 6-9 p.m., free

Art in Odd Places

Here’s an excuse to go for a walk that doesn’t (necessarily) involve Pokemon. Art in Odd Places is an outdoor art fair that takes place along the entire stretch of 14th Street. This year’s theme is race, and 34 artists explore it through topics like safety, politics, class and religion. Its mission is to bridge communities and foster public discourse. Friday is the opening reception, and Sunday offers a speaker’s corner with comics, poets, dancers and others presenting live works. Oct. 6-9, 14th Street from Ave. C to the Hudson, free

FILMS

Queer ’90s

In 1992 a strange thing happened: American moviegoers couldn’t stop talking about a movie about a trans character. That film was “The Crying Game,” and it unleashed an avalanche of LGBTQ bodies — historically mostly regulated to coded scene-stealers, besties and punchlines. The Metrograph’s “Queer ’90s” series spends October showing a diversity still lacking from multiplexes, with classics like “My Own Private Idaho” and the fabulous-o-rama Australian import “The Adventures of Priscilla, Queen of the Desert.” There are plenty of obscurities sprinkled throughout as well, and now’s a good time to revisit Angelina Jolie’s finest work: as the swaggering, self-destructive model of “Gia.” Through Oct. 30, 7 Ludlow St.

BOOKS

“Sweet Noshings”

Apple with honey is a classic, of course, but the sugar addicts among us were probably left unsated this Rosh Hashana. If your humble New Year treat had you craving something naughtier, then you should definitely check out “Sweet Noshings,” a dessert cookbook by food blogger Amy Kritzer (What Jew Wanna Eat). She’ll be cooking her classic Jewish treats with a twist for the audience (with samples for all) as well as signing books at the American Jewish Historical Society. Oct. 6, 6:30 p.m., 15 W. 16th St., $10

FOOD

Plating the Past: A Taste of the 19th Century

Taste authentic recipes from the 1800s while dining on ceramic plates straight from the time period, taken from behind the glass cases of the Mount Vernon Hotel Museum and Garden. This special evening combines dining and learning as history consultant Allen Miller discusses the utensils and dinnerware that guests will use to enjoy courses of long-lost dinner standards like syllabub, savory pies and gingerbread cake. Get tickets by calling 212-838-6878. Oct. 7, 7 p.m., 421 E. 61st St., $65

ARTS

Gay Gotham

Queer artists and trendsetters defined New York City culture and nightlife for decades, but often in silence and away from the limelight. A new exhibit at the Museum of the City of New York is dedicated to paying some of the iconic heroes of the Big Apple’s heyday their dues, from the well-known to the obscure, in photographs, paintings, letters and more. Special programs include “Photography and Homoerotic Desire,” “Making the Queer Scene” and an LGBTQ Teen Summit. Oct. 7-Feb. 26, 2017, 1220 Fifth Ave., $14

POP CULTURE

The New Yorker Festival

Covering all of pop culture, from literature to television, music and the Internet, The New Yorker Festival brings together some of today’s most informed and entertaining commentators for panels and presentations in a three-day fest. Highlights include a “Mr. Robot” discussion between Sam Esmail and Christian Slater, an evening of stories with humorist Adam Gopnik and a conversation between Jeffrey Eugenides and Zadie Smith. Sessions are selling out, so get your tickets fast. Oct. 7-9, multiple locations, $45-$60

FILM

HUMP! Film Festival

Sex columnist and podcaster Dan Savage brings his popular pornographic film festival back to Brooklyn this Saturday. HUMP! invites amateurs to create the kind of porn they’d like to see -- weird, hilarious, political -- and it all features a diverse range of real people flaunting their flaws and kinks. The best of the shorts are compiled for this festival, now in its 12th year, which tours the country and stops in NYC for one night only with screenings at 6:30, 8:30 and 10:30 p.m. Oct. 8, Dobbin St., 64 Dobbin St., Brooklyn, $30

TALK

“Blood Libel Then and Now”

Who lives, who dies, who tells your story? “Hamilton” reminds us that history is shaped by those who live to tell it. One insidious example is the rumor of killer Jews from the Medieval Ages, which prevailed for centuries, breeding anti-semitism that led to atrocities like the Holocaust. The Center for Jewish History hosts a daylong conference, “Blood Libel Then and Now: The Enduring Impact of an Imaginary Event,” to probe the roots of this dangerous myth and how it affects us today. Oct. 9, 9 a.m.-5:30 p.m., 15 W. 16th St., $25

ARTS

Broadway Sniffs Out Cancer

As if you needed another reason to love dogs, their impeccable sense of smell is currently one of the most effective ways to detect cancer -- even with all of our fancy diagnostic tests. And early detection is the key to savings lives. Broadway comes together to raise funds to train more cancer-detecting canines with a special benefit Monday at Joe’s Pub, with performances from the cast members of “Hamilton,” “A Chorus Line,” “Rent” and more. Oct. 10, 7 p.m., Joe’s Pub, 425 Lafayette St., $50-$2,500

HOLIDAY

Columbus Day Parade

Though an increasingly controversial holiday, Columbus Day gives us the chance to discuss our nation’s “discovery” and its cultural significance. Plus, there’s a parade! Join thousands of spectators to enjoy the music and dancing as over 100 groups (that’s over 35,000 marchers) lead the way. Oct. 10, 11 a.m.-3 p.m., Fifth Ave. from 44th to 72nd sts., free