The equality movement may leap forward when there is a headline-making event, but all the work leading up to it happens in community spaces. Here are four spots where NYC's LGBT artists and activists share in their experiences and shape the future of the equality movement.

Leslie + Lohman Museum of Gay and Lesbian Art
26 Wooster St., SoHo

Dedicated entirely to the works of LGBT artists, this museum was created out of the need to preserve the artwork of gay artists succumbing to AIDS in the 1980s. Along with various exhibitions on display throughout the year, the museum holds film screenings, panel discussions and curator talks. Their current main exhibition, “Interface: Queer Artist Forming Community Through Social Media,” features the work of 30 artists, mostly based in NYC, as they explore the successes — and failures — of social networks as a way to connect and inspire the creative community.

Bureau of General Services – Queer Division
208 W. 13th St. #210, West Village

BGSQD is as much an event space as it is a bookstore. In addition to supporting the work of LGBTQ writers, it’s also a gathering place for socializing and discussion. The Bureau offers a monthly work-in-progress series by queer artists, book readings and launches, and open mic nights, among others events. 

Queer | Art | Film
323 6th Ave., West Village

This monthly film screening series at the IFC Theater invites “unique and homosexual” artists to present and discuss a movie they’ve taken inspiration from in their careers. Past hosts have included actress and comedian Lea DeLaria, filmmaker Desiree Akhavan and artist Chitra Ganesh. Their current series, “Black Summer Nights,” celebrates queer African- American artists.  

Lesbian Herstory Archives
484 14th St., Park Slope

Founded in 1974, this collection of works about the lesbian community’s history, including sexism, femnisim and politics, has grown to include over 11,000 books, periodicals, photographs and CDs. The Archives will hold an open house and tours on June 27 before the curators step away — to walk in the NYC Dyke March.

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