Uber agreed to a settlement with three blind riders and the National Federation of the Blind Thursday, after the group sued the company for denying passengers service because they were accompanied by guide dogs.

The rideshare company agreed to pay $225,000 to the Federation over a period of three years, DNAinfo reported. Those funds will cover the costs for monitors who will now perform random spot checks to ensure drivers are complying with non-discrimination rules.

The company also agreed to some new changes in policy, as well as training for its drivers that will include quarterly reminders they are legally required to provide such service.

A driver will be fired if Uber receives more than one complaint about the provider denying service to those with service animals, according to a statement from the Federation.

Among the riders named in the lawsuit was Michael Hingson, who escaped the 9/11 terror attacks by walking down 78 flights of stairs with his then yellow lab, Roselle.

He told DNAinfo that he’s heard many stories about blind people all over the country facing similar discrimination when using the app, and was pleased with the settlement.

"For me and other blind people it means Uber has taken enough of a commitment that their drivers know that if they refuse to take me because I have a guide dog, they won’t be Uber drivers anymore," he reportedly said. "It’s really a major step."

You can read the full settlement here.