Having hundreds of millions of active users is an amazingly wonderful thing, but figuring out how monetize hundreds of millions of users without losing them is still a very mysterious thing – at least for social media juggernaut Twitter.

The frenetic information delivery system sank below $20 per share, the company's lowest stock price in its history. Following a flurry of proposals and rumored gambits, including adding a novel 10,000 character limit expansion, Twitter still seems to have difficulty convincing investors it's a good bet.

Today's price represents a nearly 70 percent decline from the company's highest price.

One problem for investors includes jitters about whether or not Twitter has what it takes to maintain its existing users while attracting new ones.

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Wired explained that the social media site "seems to be trying, well, pretty much anything that sticks to attract new users" including launching "Moments, which showcases popular and newsworthy tweets in a separate tab, to make the service easier to use." Users have generally seemed positive, or at least neutral, on the Moments tab.

A rumored proposal to expand tweets to a limit of 10,000 characters, standing athwart the platform's groundbreaking and globally known 140 character limit, garnered curiosity from financial writers – and swift condemnation from many everyday users.

Notwithstanding those concerns – and Twitter's ominous stock slip today – some analysts cautioned against reading too much into the stock's downward spiral. 

After all, Twitter "is still expected to report revenue growth of nearly 50 percent in the fourth quarter and sales growth of more than 40 percent for 2016," CNN Money explained. "That's impressive."