Howie Roseman is shooting from the hip.

And so far this season, it seems to be working.

The muddled, confusing, contradictory offseason the Eagles have had clearly has not followed a preconceived plan or philosophy. But after overpaying for Sam Bradford and Chase Daniel, paying a ransom to draft Carson Wentz, and then eleventh hour trades to jettison Bradford (for a first and fourth round pick) and Eric Rowe (for an offensive lineman and a pick), the Eagles are arguably in better shape than they were six months ago.

"In terms of what we're trying to do, we're just trying to put together and have a process where we can become a great team again," the Eagles' executive vice president of football operations Roseman said. "We think our fans deserve that and that's what we're looking to do. We know that’s a process; that doesn't happen overnight. We're just going to take it one day at a time and one transaction at a time."

A day at a time seems to be the mantra. 

A few seasons ago, Eagles owner Jeffrey Lurie went on the record with reporters at the NFL owners meetings, talking about his decision to hire and hang on to Chip Kelly and his addition of general manager responsibilities to Kelly's job description.

In the interview, Lurie said he was OK with Kelly's decision to trade LeSean McCoy, a season after Kelly also chose to cut DeSean Jackson. 

"I've lived through a lot of division championships, a lot of playoff appearances, a lot of final four appearances," Lurie said in March 2015. "But our goal is further than that. We want to deliver a Super Bowl.

"It's very difficult to get from good to great. It's a gamble to go from good to great because you could go from good to mediocre with changes."

The Eagles went to mediocre fairly quickly after Kelly made his moves and implemented an offensive scheme that may not be well-suited for the NFL. However, Roseman's recent transactional decisions seem to better reflect Lurie's hopes when he took the bold step of hiring Kelly in the first place.

Just over the last few months, Roseman has traded away Kelly burdens DeMarco Murray and Mark Sanchez, has swapped Dennis Kelly for high-ceiling stud receiver Dorial Green-Beckham, and completed the aforementioned trades of Bradford and Rowe.

With Doug Pederson bringing back his mentor Andy Reid's scheme, the Eagles seem to finally have an aggressive GM providing players for a coaching philosophy that has been, more or less, tried and true in the early 2000s in Philly and recently in Kansas City.

The combination of Pederson and Kelly could be winning formula. Aggression meets convention.

"I just know I'm going to coach the guys that we have hard," the coach said Monday. "I'm going to make sure that they're ready and prepared. That's my job. We just take it one at a time."