Chip Kelly's philosophy when it comes to football is to move fast. The faster his offense plays, the more plays the team gets to run.

It's the same when it comes to preparation. But that could be hurting the team.

A day after going on WIP's 'The Locker Room' and questioning some of Billy Davis' decisions, particularly in red zone situations, Malcolm Jenkins pulled back the curtain on the way the Eagles do business in the actual locker room.

"I think the way that the schedule is set up allows us to get a lot done," he said, "but it doesn't give you the opportunity to have those long extended meetings in a team setting. We spend a lot of time in individual groups, there is not a lot of meeting time with the entire team. 

"I don't think that that's a bad thing -- I think we get a lot more accomplished. But any time you move faster throughout the day you don't have time to double back. All our stuff gets done early in the week, so sometimes, those mistakes or corrections or communications are held to the end of the week. Some people learn differently. I spend a lot of time here at the facility... me personally, I came into the league on a team where I didn't leave the facility until 7-o-clock."

Jenkins says he often discusses his views with the Birds' defensive coordinator Davis, but also says he understand the coaches decisions and respects the way they chose to run the team.

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The defensive back also shed light on the strict seperation Davis and Kelly implement when it comes to prep work each and every week.

"From a coaching style, I was brought up a little bit different," the safety said, likely referencing his years as a New Orleans Saint. "Most mistakes that teammates make or players make are brought up in more of a team setting, but the approach here is more in the individual rooms, and it's by design and that's on purpose. A lot of the times when things happen, say on the defensive side of the ball, the secondary isn't playing well, the mistakes aren't pointed out in front of the entire defense, it's dealt with in the DB room. A D-lineman might not know necessarily what the mistakes are or what we need to get better."

With the Eagles often appearing not to be on the same page, perhaps this separation is hurting the club.

"For me, I'm a bit of a control freak," Jenkins said. I like to know what the mistakes are, and what we're trying to get better at."

That being said, Jenkins is not about to turn on the Eagles' (thus far disastrously unsuccessful) scheme.

"Every now and then, this is probably two or three plays a game, [the opposing offense] schemes up something... but I think it's more of us not executing our scheme."