(Reuters) - Controversial New York Giants kicker Josh Brown was sacked by the National Football League team on Tuesday after he became embroiled in a domestic violence case.

Four days after Brown was temporarily barred by the team from games and practices after documents showed his then-wife accused him of a years-long pattern of physical and emotional abuse, he was cut from the roster.

"We believed we did the right thing at every juncture in our relationship with Josh," Giants president John Mara said in a statement. "Our beliefs, our judgments and our decisions were misguided. We accept that responsibility.

"We hope that Josh will continue to dedicate himself to rehabilitation, and to becoming a better person and father.

"We will continue to support him in his efforts to continue counseling, and we hope that Josh and his family can find peace and a positive resolution."

Earlier on Tuesday, Brown apologized for any negative impact he may have had on the team and said that he was getting help in a bid to become a "voice of change and not a statistic".

In a statement, Brown said: "My journey will continue forever as a person determined to leave a positive legacy and I embrace the opportunities to show and speak about what has helped me to be that man.

"I am sorry that my past has called into question the character or integrity of The New York Giants, Mr. Mara or any of those who have supported me along the way.

"In the coming days and weeks I plan on telling more of the pain I had caused and the measures taken to get help so I may be the voice of change and not a statistic."

The NFL suspended Brown in August for one game following his arrest in May 2015, when his then-wife, Molly, told police he grabbed her by the wrist during a heated argument at their home in Woodinville, Washington.

But in documents the King County Sheriff's Office released last week, Molly Brown said the Giants player had been physically abusive toward her more than 20 times.

The documents also included journals and written statements by Brown in which he admits to being abusive.

(Reporting by Mark Lamport-Stokes in Los Angeles; Editing by Frank Pingue)