There was a Brandon Marshall-Ryan Fitzpatrick lovefest on Monday between the New York Jets top wide receiver and his quarterback. Turns out their offensive coordinator wants in on this tender, loving care as well. 

There certainly is a reputation around the league of Marshall as a quarterback killer and a locker room cancer, someone with a big personality that can get him in trouble. He also works for the media as the only active NFL player on Showtime's 'Inside the NFL,' giving him a very unique and visible platform.  He recently got into some hot water on the show for saying that he's heard around the league that race plays an issue when it comes to NFL mandated suspensions. 

On Thursday when asked about Marshall, Chan Gailey succinctly opened by describing him as "a pro, he understands about how to go about working on the practice field." The lovin' just continued from there. 

"I heard all the bad rumors, sure we did. Coach [Karl] Dorrell worked with him in Miami but when he came here and we visited and we talked, there were no issues whatsoever. He's been great," Gailey said. 

"The old saying 'Where there's smoke, there's fire.' That fits at times. Certainly did fit this time." 

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Bowles echoed similar sentiments to Gailey's when asked about his Pro Bowl wide receiver. Marshall leads the Jets in receiving yards, receptions and touchdowns but he can also be a tremendous headache. 

He became surplus goods with the Chicago Bears because of his locker room falling out, leading them to trade him this offseason to New York. Same could be said with his previous employer, the Miami Dolphins.  

Bowles knew Marshall from when he was the defensive coordinator and then the Dolphins interim head coach for the final four games of the 2011 season.  

"I knew the Brandon who was coming in here so I was comfortable with it," Bowles said. 

Gailey, who didn't really know Marshall until this spring when they met, echoed similar sentiments. 

"The very first time, the very first time he came in the building, he sat upstairs and we had lunch together," Gailey said. "It was very refreshing."