Quantcast
Cross-country skiing at the Beijing Winter Olympics – Metro US

Cross-country skiing at the Beijing Winter Olympics

An aerial view shows the cross country venue of the
An aerial view shows the cross country venue of the Beijing Winter Olympics in Zhangjiakou

(Reuters) – Focus on cross-country skiing at the Beijing Olympics.

THE ABSOLUTE BASICS

* Twelve races with a variety of distances, formats and styles

* Classic style is a forward-striding technique

* Freestyle is side-to-side

* Skiathlon combines both styles

* There are sprints, relays and longer distances

HOW MANY MEDALS?

There are 12 gold medals up for grabs, six each for women and men.

WHAT CAN WE EXPECT IN BEIJING?

A battle royale for medals, with the Nordic nations leading the way. Johannes Klaebo of Norway and Russia’s Alexander Bolshunov are the two biggest names on the men’s side, with Natalya Neprayeva (Russia), Therese Johaug (Norway) and Ebba Andersson (Sweden) among the leading women.

WHAT HAPPENED IN PYEONGCHANG?

Traditionally a superpower in the sport, Norway dominated by taking seven of the 12 gold medals on offer and sweeping the podium in the men’s skiathlon. On the final day of the Games, Marit Bjoergen stormed to victory to become the most successful winter Olympian of all time with 15 medals.

WHAT’S NEW?

There are no major changes to the sport or the equipment used ahead of the 2022 Games.

WHEN IS IT HAPPENING?

Feb. 5 to 22.

WHERE IS IT HAPPENING?

The National Cross-Country Centre in Zhangjiakou, approximately 190km northwest of Beijing.

HOW DID WE GET HERE?

Cross-country skiing is one of the oldest winter sports and is believed to have originated in Norway. It has been part of every Winter Games since the inaugural event in 1924 and is hugely popular in the Nordic region, central and Eastern Europe and North America.

WELL FANCY THAT

Prior to the 2018 Games the American team told Reuters they felt they could win their first medals since 1976 – days later, Jessie Diggins and Kikkan Randall won a stunning gold medal in the women’s team sprint race, edging out Sweden by .019 seconds.

(Reporting by Philip O’Connor; Editing by Ken Ferris)

More from our Sister Sites