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Putting thanks into Thanksgiving - Metro US

Putting thanks into Thanksgiving

Thankfulness has more to do with who you are than where you are. For instance, today is Monday. For all of us. It’s October, meaning that in most parts of this country the weather can be loosely described as “complete crapolla.”

In spite of this, some of us are thinking, “A new week! Who knows what magical things may happen? And look, a free newspaper. Could life be any better?” Whereas others are thinking, “Yes, it damn well could.”

It is simply the case that some people find it harder to be thankful than others. Normally, we call these people “pessimists” or “Toronto Maple Leaf fans.”

The first step to being thankful is to consider which type of person you are. Ask yourself this question:

“If my life were a movie, what kind of movie would it be?”

Those who see their lives as a Sandra Bullock romantic comedy believe that, though there will be a kooky mix-up and all will seem lost two thirds of the way through, ultimately life will end happily and your hair will look great. These people find it easy to be thankful.

If you picture your life as a Bruce Willis action movie, then you may see the world as a place where good always triumphs over evil and poor acting and questionable plot-lines will always be graciously overlooked by others so long as you make enough things blow up. You also are a thankful person. A little scary and delusional perhaps, but thankful.

If you see your life as one of those arty foreign films in which everyone sits around intoning, “We must go to Moscow,” and the entire thing is shot from the perspective of a three-week old loaf of pumpernickel bread, it may be harder for you to see life as something to be thankful for.

In fact, you should forget about thankful and just seek help. Now.

So, can those of us who are gratitude-ily challenged still enjoy Turkey Day? Absolutely.

Simply change your outlook by repeating one of these mantras:

“Sure things are bad, but I’m way better off than that turkey.”

“My relatives are charming and cranberry jelly mold is my favourite dish.”

“I don’t have to do this again until Christmas.

Happy Thanksgiving!

• A big shout-out to Metro readers Beth, Mark, Stacey and Nancy who came to hear me read from my new book, Parting Gifts. I’m thankful for you!

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