Boston was spared by the wrath of snowstorm Jonas, which clobbered the mid-Atlantic and the southern portion of the Northeast throughout the weekend. 

But instead of letting the city’s new truck-mounted snow blowers gather dust, Mayor Marty Walsh sent two large scale trucks and nine Department of Public Works employees to Baltimore to help with their snow removal on Sunday. 

According to the city’s website, these pieces of heavy machinery can kick up 2,750 tons of snow per hour, launching it 150 feet. DPW plowed about 295,000 miles of roadway this past winter, or roughly 12 trips around the earth, removing over 40,000 truckloads of snow from city streets, and melted 50,000 tons of snow at snow farms. Boston followed in Montreal’s steps in purchasing this equipment following the historic blizzards in 2015.

"To show appreciation for the support Boston received from cities and states throughout the Northeast region last winter including New York City and Connecticut,  we offered to lend our equipment to Baltimore to help clear streets and keep roadways safe for the public," Walsh said in a statement. " After having faced 10 feet of snow last winter, we understand the difficulty in facing a snowstorm, and I'm glad to know the snow plows and crew members have successfully assisted them in their snow removal efforts."
Baltimore got hit with the snowiest blizzard on their record books, with about 18 to 24 inches over the past weekend. The Boston crews will help Charm City dig out until Friday. Attempts to call Baltimore City Hall for comment were unsuccessful.
As of Monday, 27 people died as a result of the storm and many areas are still digging out from Southern New England to Florida, according to