After a historic 108.6 inches of snowfall in Boston this winter, the melting snow has revealed something unbeknownst to residents -- lots and lots of trash.

“After this unparalleled and unprecedented storm, the city is very dirty and we have to clean it up,” Councilor Matt O’Malley said at a recent public hearing on how the city should handle the debris clean up.

Since the snowfall began, trash collection has been down 11 percent and the city has spent over $40 million on snow removal, according to Interim Public Works Commissioner Michael Dennehy.

Dennehy told councilors that since nightly street sweeping crews have begun working last Tuesday, over 200 tons of trash has been collected. That’s more than 400,000 pounds. 

Councilor O’Malley convened the hearing with officials in charge of other major city services in order to develop strategies to combat the increasing problem. 

One-method officials agreed on was to extend the “Boston Shines” program, a citywide volunteer clean up that has been extended from one weekend to three throughout the months of April and May.

Dennehy said that the public works staff has been working diligently, even on weekends, to make improvements on trash collection. Officials are also advocating for more public works funding in order to speed up clean up efforts. 

Another city council hearing will be held at the end of the month to evaluate the progress on trash and snow removal.