HONK! Festival

This unique annual event brings together activist street bands from across the world—think of them as high school marching bands gone rogue, seized by the spirit of social justice and playing an original repertoire more influenced by indie rock than the National Anthem. In addition to the central parade from Davis to Harvard, there are plenty of other events over these three days. October 7 through 9 , Cambridge and Somerville , Free,

Nick Waterhouse

In a Los Angeles indie scene dominated by a deluge of similar-sounding garage/psych rock bands, Nick Waterhouse took a different path, creating a meticulously old school R&B sound that’s fantastically evocative. However phony Waterhouse may seem for this clever musical charade, his whole vibe is so seductive that it’s easy to forgive him. His latest, “Never Twice”, dropped September 30. October 10, 7 p.m., The Sinclair, 52 Church St., Cambridge, $15, 18+,


Chris Edwards

Figures like Laverne Cox and Caitlyn Jenner have given transwomen higher visibility than ever, but transmen are still less visible, which is what makes Chris Edwards’ new memoir so valuable. In the book, bluntly titled “Balls”, he tells how he transitioned from female to male while maintaining his job at a top American ad agency. Balls indeed. October 6, 6:30 p.m., Barnes and Noble, Prudential Center, 800 Boylston St., Boston, Free,



Why go to a haunted house when you could visit a whole haunted farm? “HYSTERIA” takes place on Connor’s Farm in Danvers, part of which happens to have been an actual Puritan burial ground. Also, it’s closer than New Hampshire’s notorious “Spooky World”. Since visitorship increases as Halloween approaches, you may want to check it out this week if you’re inclined. Through October 30, Connor’s Farm, 30 Valley Rd., Danvers, $15-$25,


Reefer Madness: The Musical

This 1998 Off-Broadway hit is not simply an adaptation of the notorious 1930’s anti-cannabis B-movie. That would have been ridiculous. Instead, it’s a version shot through with the ironic gaze of the present, which means it’s even more absurd, exaggerating the film’s exaggerated warnings about weed to hilariously apocalyptic proportions. Oh, and there are songs! October 7 through October 16, Arsenal Center for the Arts, 321 Arsenal St., Watertown, $25,

We’re Gonna Die

This musical by Young Jean Lee is a stripped down affair, consisting of a storyteller (Obehi Janice) backed with a rock band. It might sound a little bare, but the subject matter is death—not just literal death, but all the little symbolic ones along the way. But don’t worry, despite the grim realities, there’s humor and hope here too. Through October 8, Oberon, 2 Arrow St., Cambridge, $15-$35,


New England Indonesian Festival

The name says it all — this festival celebrates Indonesian culture, with food, performance, vendors of all sorts and everything else you’ve come to expect from such events. First held in 2013, it was the first and remains the largest Indonesian festival in the Boston area. Special events this year include a workshop demonstrating Batik, an Indonesian method of dying clothes. October 8, 12 p.m., to 6 p.m. Copley Square, 560 Boylston St., Boston, Free,


The Manchurian Candidate

Coolidge Corner Theater screens this classic 1962 political thriller starring none other than Ol’ Blue Eyes himself, Frank Sinatra, as a the commander of a platoon that escaped Soviet imprisonment. Soon, however, he discovers that the escape may have been just was his enemies wanted. But what else do they want with him and his men? And can he stop it in time? October 10, 7:30 p.m., Coolidge Corner Theater, 290 Harvard St., Brookline, $12,


Future Arts 2016

This show includes work from 30 mostly local artists from the worlds of contemporary and street art, plus DJs, installations and live painting. Online sample show a wide variety of styles, but many have a comic book and/or pop culture feel. If you’re being held back by the cover charge, know that your ticket cost benefits the Boston Children’s Hospital.
October 8, 6 p.m. to 1 a.m., Boston Center for the Arts, 539 Tremont St., Boston, $18-$50,


Brunch Battle

Several local establishments throw down to see who’ll win the coveted title of “Best Brunch”. You get to sample from all of them and cast your vote. Your ticket price benefits Community Servings, an organization providing food for the critically ill and homebound—so you can pay all the deliciousness forward. In addition to said brunch samples, there’s also a full bar. Bottoms up! October 8, 12 p.m. to 3 p.m., District Hall, 75 Northern Ave., Boston, $25, 21+,


The Hennessy & Tickles Tour

After some thinking, we’re not completely sure if “Hennessy and tickles” sounds sketchier than “Netflix and chill”. But maybe this isn’t too important. What’s important is that the Hennessy & Tickles Tour brings you the stand-up of fast-rising comic talents Jak Knight and Langston Kerman, with Lillian DeVane bringing up the rear for this show.  October 7, 7 p.m., Great Scott, 1222 Comm. Ave., Allston $10-$12, 18+,