Bill Cosby’s lawyers have asked the U.S. District Court of the Eastern District of Pennsylvania for the details of a 2005 settlement in a sexual-battery lawsuit to remain sealed from the public
The plaintiff, a Temple University employee who accused Cosby of sexually abusing her, would like the settlement unsealed. 
Coby’s lawyers defended the comedian, and wrote in their request that in the 70s, everyone used quaaludes, and that Cosby never admitted to rape. 
“Reading the media accounts, one would conclude that defendant has admitted to rape,” Cosby’s lawyers wrote. “And yet defendant admitted to nothing more than being one of the many people who introduced quaaludes into their consensual sex life in the 1970s.”
Everyone was doing it -- essentially. 
Cosby’s lawyers, in their request to keep the documents sealed accused the plaintiff of riding “on the coattails of the barrage of inaccurate and negative media attention that followed this Court's July 6, 2015 release of excerpts from Defendant's deposition.”
The lawyers are of course referencing, at least in part, The New York Times’ recent article describing Cosby as “an unapologetic, cavalier playboy, someone who used a combination of fame, apparent concern and powerful sedatives in a calculated pursuit of young women” in released court documents.
About 45 women in the last couple of years have come forward with allegations that the Cosby drugged and raped them. The comedian has never been charged and denies every allegation. 

Matt Lee is a Web producer for Metro New York. He writes about almost everything and anything. Talk to him (or yell at him) on Twitter so he doesn’t feel lonely @mattlee2669.