Ozzy Osbourne’s colorful public life is peppered with well-known tales of drugs and booze, bitten-off bat heads and dead doves. But recently, it’s a very public affair — that has caused a rift with his wife and longtime manager, Sharon, leaving the Birmingham, UK-born Black Sabbath frontman and solo artist admitting to sex addiction. In the 1980s, Osbourne was dubbed the "Prince of Darkness" and banned from San Antonio, Texas, for urinating on the Alamo (an oversight, Osbourne has claimed in interviews, not disrespect). But San Antonio is where Black Sabbath’s final show will take place, ending a five-year reunion spree. Speaking from his home in Los Angeles, Osbourne tells us he is not retiring, but instead will continue doing what he does: Osbourne, after all, is a rock and roll singer.

The final leg of the final tour — how does it feel for you?

It hasn’t quite sunk in yet. I am sure it will be pretty emotional once it comes to the final show, but everything has to come to an end at some point, and it has been an incredible journey.

Sabbath reformed five years ago. Has it been healing for you guys?

There was no healing necessary. We came together as mature adults who wanted to play and make great music together.

Do you recall how you felt recording that first and still iconic and highly regarded Black Sabbath album in 1970?

[I remember] the excitement of being in a real studio, and as soon as we had finished there was then the excitement of having it released. It was all so new to us.

Nowadays, the media call you the Prince of Darkness affectionately, but for a while in the 1980s, people seriously ripped into you. How did it feel to be called a Satanist?

It comes with the territory. I have never been one to conform to rules and so I just told them where they can stick their opinions. No wonder they thought I was the Prince of Darkness.

Can you imagine how this last Sabbath show in San Antonio will be like emotionally?

The whole tour has been an emotional rollercoaster. Though the one I am most aware of is the very last show ever in Birmingham, England. I am sure I will be nervous for San Antonio, too. It’s a great rock town and as you know I wasn’t allowed back there for quite some time.

What are your plans for after the tour?

I’m currently playing around with some song ideas. I have a few things jotted down and once Black Sabbath is off the road, I will be heading into the studio with my band to get the songs recorded. Once it’s all in the can you can be sure to see me back on the road again.