How do you succeed as an intern? If you’re just starting an internship, you’re likely to walk into your company with a can-do attitude and the confidence to take on any task your employer throws you way.

Until, of course, the going gets tough. Then what?  

Billy Bush, former host of the syndicated entertainment TV show "Access Hollywood" and the new co-host of the third hour of NBC's "Today" show appeared at the Samsung 837’s Mini-Internship series in New York on Wednesday to talk about his own career challenges — and how he made it to the top. 

The series hopes to connect high school and college students with professionals in a variety of fields. In each session, they discuss their path to success and offer advice to young people who are trying to make an impression on their employers. Previous sessions have featured stars like Iron Chef David Burke and director/screenwriter Ang Lee.

Bush reflected on his past internship and work experiences before making it big, and stressed the importance of putting yourself out there: “We’re all in sales and marketing in some way. We’re marketing ourselves,” he said.

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As for idealing with all the competition, particularly in the fields of media and entertainment? Bush said, "Just being willing to do anything. Sometimes I marvel at what people are willing to do, especially if you’re trying to enter something. You want to be that person that is willing to do anything. First in. Last out.”

Samsung director of corporate social responsibility Ann Woo, who moderated the event, also had some words of wisdom for the recent graduates in attendance. "I think it’s important as a leader to understand what it takes when you’re working with your team,” she said, emphasizing that teamwork is also a crucial component of being a successful intern.

Bush also urged current interns and those just starting out in their careers to be persistent and share their own ideas. “You can’t be the asker all the time,” he said.

Our takeway: Stay passionate about your craft, take all the constructive criticism you can get — and don't be afraid to put yourself out there.