Mayor Bill de Blasio announced a major education policy plan in the Bronx on Wednesday, pledging to significantly improve graduation rates, colleges preparedness and universal access to computer science and algebra by 2026. 

The $186 million annual commitment from the de Blasio administration aims to bump up New York City’s graduation rate to 80 percent from 68 percent, and expand course offerings to prepare students for colleges and trade school.

Another program, called "Single Shepard," will pair mentors with students in grades 6 to 12 from two struggling districts to help guide them to adulthood.  

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“Just as every parent wants this success for their own child, we want it for all of New York City’s children,” de Blasio said. “So our schools must prepare every single student to achieve their highest potential. In other words, schools must run on the twin engines of equity and excellence.”

De Blasio made the announcement at Bronx Latin School, which he said boasts an 89 percent four-year graduation rate despite 92 percent of the students living in poverty.

"I’ve seen our schools evolve over the last 50 years, and I know these are the right ingredients for transformative change," Schools Chancellor Carmen Fariña said in a statement. 

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