The NYPD will now require all officers to issue a “receipt” to anyone they stop on the street for questioning, according to a report in the Daily News.

Patrick Lynch, head of the Patrolmen’s Benevolent Association, the largest NYPD union, called the new receipts “another nail in the coffin of proactive policing” and predicted more complaints against officers in retaliation, according to the Daily News.

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The “What Is a Stop?” receipts will be given to anyone who is stopped by police but not arrested, the Daily News reported. Each receipt will require that officers give their name, check one or more of six reasons, such as proximity to a crime scene or matching a suspect’s description, regarding why that person was stopped and explain the legal authority officers have to conduct such stops.

In addition, a Sept. 21 internal NYPD order states that two factors police were previously able to cite — furtive movements or being in a high-crime area — are no longer valid reasons for detaining anyone, the Daily News reported, adding that the order also states that people cannot be stopped “because they are members of a racial or ethnic group that appears more frequently in local crime suspect data.”

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Christopher Dunn, associate legal director of the New York Civil Liberties Union, said these changes are “important first steps in reducing illegal and discriminatory stops, while the new receipt will improve accountability and hopefully de-escalate tensions,” according to the Daily News, which claimed that street stops reached a record high of nearly 700,000 in 2011 but are on pace to reach 42,000 this year.