We’ve seen the future of luxury residences, and it includes robot butlers!

At least according to 520 West 28th, the new fancy apartment building going up along the High Line by famed architect Zaha Hadid. The woman behind such works as the MAXXI Museum in Rome and the controversial Qatar 2022 World Cup Stadium — whose renderings critics have compared to part of the female anatomy — was in town yesterday to fete the construction of her first building in the Big Apple.

“I’ve wanted to do something here in New York for 35 years,” she said. “I used to show in a gallery on, I think, 23rd Street, and whenever I went there we would always talk about the High Line, so it was very nice to do this project.”

And — as you can guess from the woman who once included a helicopter pad in a design for a residential tower — it’s pretty bonkers.

The curvaceous, 11-story glass-and-handmade-metal structure has 21 interlaced floors — which create a sort of zigzagging chevron effect — and comprises just 39 units, all luxury condos, of course. Other amenities include a 75-foot sky-lit swimming pool, a a 12-seat IMAX theater (the first residential IMAX screening room in the city) and those aforementioned robot servants.

“Automated robots will park your car and bring your storage to a private viewing room, a discreet private viewing room,” says Greg Gushee, executive vice president of Related Companies, the site’s developer. “That’s never been done before.”

As for the units themselves, they’re all sleek and sci-fi — Hadid did the interiors as well — with lacquered wall units that disguise any hardware or wires, tempered sliding glass walls and 11-foot-high ceilings, and the largest sprawling 6,391 square feet.

“We fell in love with the design right away,” Gushee gushes. “We saw this optimistic vision of the future, and it was incredible: beautiful slick and actually buildable, not cheaply, but still buildable.”

Prices range from $4.95 million to $50 million for the penthouse, but Gushee says buyers are already showing interest. He’s right: utopia, with its robot attendants, doesn’t come cheap.