The Republicans heated up the grill in Cleveland, and now it’s time for the Democrats to slap on their steak in Philadelphia. Here is the sizzle you should look for at the Democratic National Convention this week.

 

1) CITY OF SISTERLY AFFECTION: It’s been a long time coming and there is not an ounce of surprise left in the moment, but you can still bet when Hillary Clinton is officially nominated her party will go into a crazy celebration. She and her loyal fans have long dreamed of Clinton being the first female nominee for a major party and with good reason: It is genuinely historic. Republicans will have to step carefully in attacking Clinton’s triumphant moment for fear of appearing misogynistic, but um … watch for them to attack anyway.

 

2) E-MAILS AGAIN!: Even as her biggest triumph looms, Clinton is dealing with another email controversy, this one not of her own making. WikiLeaks released some 20,000 DNC messages bolstering the claim by Bernie Sanders (and Donald Trump, by the way) that the party has been secretly maneuvering all along to make sure Clinton won. Included in the emails is one very nasty idea of suggesting to voters that Sanders, who is Jewish, is actually an atheist. Seriously. The DNC head, Florida Congresswoman Debbie Wasserman Schultz, has agreed (with apparently a lot of shoving) to step down at the end of the convention. Watch for angry backlash by Sanders supporters, especially amid news that Schultz will now serve as the honorary head of a Clinton campaign initiative. And if Clinton gives any interviews to any real reporters, watch for her to get hammered by questions over that cozy arrangement.

 

3) BOUNCE: Before the week is done, the big political question will be who got a bounce and how big was it? The conventions typically give momentum to the nominees, so pollsters will be furiously trying to measure it. Some of Trump’s latest numbers will be chewed over this week, but watch for analysis of Clinton’s bounce to be coming up fast as we head into — finally — the sprint to November. 

CNN's Tom Foreman is covering both conventions.