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80+ artists commemorate ‘One Year of Resistance’

“They are many forms of activism, and art can be powerful way to convey that message," said Indira Cesarine, founder/curator of the group show at The Untitled Space.

As many will likely be looking back this week at the year that was President Trump’s first in the White House to reflect on his accomplishments, failures and tweets, 80-plus artists took to their respective mediums to commemorate the occasion their own way.

Opening Tuesday at The Untitled Space in SoHo, “One Year of Resistance” is a follow up to the gallery’s acclaimed “Uprise/Angry Women” exhibit last January that responded to Trump’s election. 

“It is an important time to maintain momentum in the fight against his divisive politics and emphasize continued solidarity,” said Indira Cesarine, gallery founder and curator of “One Year of Resistance.” “I really honed in on artists that investigated key issues of the last year without compromising.”

Artist Rebecca Leveille has felt “incandescent rage” over the past year, and while that informed her piece in “Uprise,” this time around, her work has a “more positive, powerful vibe.” The piece is a vibrant depiction of her “personal totem,” Wonder Woman. 

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Gal Gadot portrayed the iconic character in last year’s blockbuster smash "Wonder Woman," which was the first female-led superhero film — and a bright, inspiring spot for women in a Hollywood that later saw countless sexual harassment allegations against industry bigwigs and actors surface.

“Wonder Woman here in this show is a perfect symbol of resistance and defiance to the profound sexism that the election of Trump represented to so many,” the artist said.

The works in “One Year of Resistance” cover many mediums and topics, including immigration, reproductive rights, white supremacy, gun control, empowerment and the #MeToo movement.

“In a lot of respects, the works have become more serious, more introspective and more focused on specific issues that each artist personally relates to,” Cesarine said. “I hope that viewers walk away feeling the passion of these artists, as well as contemplate different points of view on these subjects. 

“These are very crucial and urgent issues we are talking about that are affecting the entire country and will have a long-lasting impact,” she added. “It is important to continue the conversation and keep raising our voices in protest. They are many forms of activism, and art can be a powerful way to convey that message.”

One Year of Resistance” will be at The Untitled Space (45 Lispenard St., Unit 1W) through Feb. 4. A portion of proceeds benefit the ACLU.
 

 
 
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